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National services

Our experts

National services

Our experts

National services

Our experts

National services

Our experts

Dr Robert Medcalf

Clinical Psychologist


Rob completed his doctorate in Clinical Psychology at Salomons, Canterbury Christ Church University. He has worked in a variety of mental health services around the south east of England including adult outpatient and residential services, child and adolescent inpatient wards, community learning disability teams, older adult services and specialist trauma services.

Prior to joining ADRU he worked for Combat Stress, the UK’s leading Military Mental Health Charity and has particular interests in post-traumatic stress disorder and the relationship between trauma and the development and maintenance of anxiety disorders. Rob sees his therapeutic role at ADRU as working together with residents to better understand and challenge their current difficulties. He feels everybody’s experiences will be specific to them and feels privileged to be able to work alongside people who are striving to achieve their goals and to improve their overall quality of life.

Education and training
  • BSc (Hons) Sport Psychology and Coaching Sciences - 2:1 (Bournemouth University), 2007
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Psychology - first with distinction (Thames Valley University), 2009
  • Doctorate in Clinical Psychology (Canterbury Christ Church University, Salomons), 2015

Publications
Hatch, S.L., Frissa, S., Verdecchia, M. et al. Identifying socio-demographic and socioeconomic determinants of health inequalities in a diverse London community: the South East London Community Health (SELCoH) study. BMC Public Health 11, 861 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-11-861