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National services

Our experts

National services

Our experts

National services

Our experts

National services

Our experts

Dr Kate Prentice

Clinical Psychologist


Biography
Dr Kate Prentice is a Clinical Psychologist for the CAMHS Adolescent At-risk and Forensic Service, which assesses and treats young people who are at risk of harm from themselves or others, and/or engaged in, or present significant risk of, serious violence, fire-setting and/or sexually inappropriate behaviour. She has a particular interest in using Dialectical Behaviour Therapy to work with young people with emotion dysregulation difficulties.
Education and training
Dr Prentice used to be a secondary school teacher and completed a BA in English at the University of Cambridge. She then completed an MPhil in Psychology and a PhD in Experimental Psychology at the University of Cambridge, the latter focused on language development.

In 2017 she completed a Doctorate in Clinical Psychology at the IOPPN, King’s College London. During her clinical training she worked for a year in the national and specialist CAMHS Dialectal Behaviour Therapy Service.

Other roles
Dr Prentice is a research supervisor on the IOPPN DClinPsy, and teaches on the course. She has delivered training workshops, teaching and conference presentations to mental health and education professionals.

Research interests include
  • Young people at risk of, or experiencing, school exclusion, on which she is currently co-supervising a DClinPsy project
  • Vulnerable young people’s experience of court trials and the criminal justice system

Publications
Johnston, K., Prentice, K., Whitehead, H., Taylor, L., Watts, R., Tranah, T. (2016). Assessing effective participation in vulnerable juvenile defendants, The Journal of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology, 27, 6, 802-814.